Sun-dried Tomato Tabbouleh

Sun-dried Tomato Tabbouleh | The Rose Table

I made tabbouleh in my dorm room nearly every week of my college career.(To read about my lifelong love of Greek food, click here.) Why? Because all you need is boiling water! I’m sure it comes as no surprise to you that I was always thinking up dishes I could whip up in my dorm room with no stove or oven. I used to buy the boxes of Tabbouleh, which came with an herb packet, but quickly realized it was much cheaper to buy a bag of bulgar wheat and play with my own herb combinations.

How to Prepare Bulgar Wheat | The Rose Table

Bulgar wheat is a healthy grain and is still a staple in my pantry. Just one cup of this whole grain has 17g of protein and 26g of fiber. To prepare bulgar wheat, just pour an equal amount of boiling water over the bulgar wheat and let it absorb for an hour. Then squeeze a bit of lemon juice and pour a lug of olive oil in, give it a stir, and let it hang out in the fridge for another hour.

Sun-dried Tomato Tabbouleh | The Rose Table

Traditional tabbouleh is made with bulgar wheat, cucumber, tomatoes, herbs, and often Feta cheese. (I don’t think I’ve ever skipped the latter.) I have made tabbouleh in a wide variety of ways over the years but never have I ever tried swapping out sun-dried tomatoes for fresh tomatoes until last night. I even had fresh tomatoes at my house, but I realized I could use those for mussels this evening so I decided to try sun-dried in my tabbouleh. Wow. It completely changes the dish adding a deepness and richness that went just perfectly with avocado and Greek yogurt. I hope you enjoy this as much as I do!

Sun-dried Tomato Tabbouleh | The Rose Table

Sun-Dried Tomato Tabbouleh
Serves 6-8

2 cups bulgar wheat
2 cups boiling water 
2 lemons
Olive oil
1/2 cucumber, peeled and chopped
1/3 cup Feta cheese (though really, who needs to measure?)
Bunch parsley, roughly chopped
4 green onions, chopped
5 radishes, sliced into half-moons
2 Tbsp Kalamata olives, chopped
3 Tbsp sun-dried tomatoes, chopped

Serving suggestion (per serving):
1/2 avocado + dollop Greek Gods plain yogurt + drizzle olive oil + sprinkle garlic sea salt  

  1. Pour 2 cups boiling water over 2 cups bulgar wheat. Cover and let sit on the counter for an hour.
  2. Squeeze two lemons into bulgar wheat and drizzle about a tablespoon of olive oil. Stir and refrigerate for one hour.
  3. Add cucumber, Feta, parsley, green onions, radishes, Kalamata olives, and sun-dried tomatoes to tabbouleh. Stir well. Give it a taste to see if it needs more olive oil.
  4. To serve, top with sliced avocado, a generous dollop of plain Greek yogurt, a drizzle of olive oil, and a sprinkle of sea salt.

Note: If you’re serving this for a bunch of people at once, feel free to top the whole dish with avocado, yogurt, olive oil, and sea salt or you can even mix the avocado in with the other ingredients. I usually make this on Monday to eat for the week and avocado turns brown so I slice however much I want to eat that day.

Sun-dried Tomato Tabbouleh | The Rose Table

Happy eating,
The Rose Table

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Hello Rose and lovely meeting you!
    I have enjoyed reading your site and learning about all your endeavors.
    I am leaving a comment here because my blood nearly boiled when I saw your post on tabbouleh. Tabbouleh is a Lebanese (not Greek!) salad and is traditionally made with flat-leaved parsley, onion, tomato, fresh mint and fine bulgur wheat (#1). the dressing is olive oil (extra-virgin) and fresh lemon juice, that’s it!
    Have a wonderful weekend!

    1. Hi there! Sorry to hear that this post made your blood boil. That’s definitely never my intention! This is not meant to be a traditional tabbouleh recipe but is a fun alternative for anyone who loves sun-dried tomatoes. I did not realize that it’s a Lebanese dish as I often order it at my favorite Greek restaurants around DFW. Thank you for letting me know its origins!

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